I read this morning Andrew Truong's blog on planet:

I guess it's okay to speak out about how we truly feel when somebody resigns over a controversial topic but not to speak out during the controversy? We should ALWAYS speak out. Freedom of Speech.

The reason why I didn't speak up is, just like many other Mozillians I suspect, for fear of retribution. Seeing the attacks perpetrated on Brendan, a well-respected member of the Mozilla community, I can only imagine the torrent of hatemail that I'm going to get for publishing this blog post. (Update: so far, I didn't get any hatemail. It seems like the fears were unjustified.) The other reason is, I didn't want to further encourage a debate which I hoped would fade off after a few days. I somehow hoped we could go back to "business as usual". We were unable to, and thus I see no reason to hold back this blog post anymore.

I live in Europe. We tend to have a different opinion on these matters. But in any case, before you go any further down, I should just mention that I do support the right for anyone to marry the one they love, and I voted according to that belief for the last few elections in my country. I am a straight person, though.

I'm going to quote a few blog posts that resonate with me, and add a few comments.

Daniel wrote:

Who said "Mozilla Community"? Who said Openness? Pfffff. I've been a Mozillian for fourteen years and I'm not even sure I still recognize myself in today's Mozilla Community. Well done guys, well done. What's the next step? 100% political correctness? Is it still possible to have a legally valid personal opinion while being at Mozilla and express it in public?

From private conversations I had with other (mostly European) Mozillians, I know for certain that people have opinions that they are afraid to express in the Mozilla Community. Some people are religious, and will take great care _not_ to reveal that fact. Some people may have other beliefs that do not align with the dominant, Silicon-Valley progressive ideology. They also make sure that these are not apparent. Andrew Truong mentions freedom of speech. I believe there is freedom of speech in the Mozilla community as long as you happen to have the right opinions.

In my personal case, I fortunately happen to side with the prevalent ideology for most points, but I am now very afraid of slipping and expressing an opinion that is not considered progressive enough. I am now afraid of what is going to happen to me then: will I be kicked out? Will people call out for my name being removed from about:credits? Will people call on Twitter for my being ousted from Mozillians.org?

Ben Moskowitz wrote:

For the record, I don’t believe Brendan Eich is a bigot. He’s stubborn, not hateful. He has an opinion. It’s certainly not my opinion, but it was the opinion of 52% of people who voted on Prop 8 just six years ago, and the world is changing fast.

Again, my European point of view on the matter is simple: I interact in my daily life with many people who do not support same-sex marriage. I'm pretty sure some bosses up my hierarchy do not support that. I believe that, ultimately, there will be less and less such people, and that society will change enough that being against same-sex marriage will be a thing of the past. I also believe that as long as my bosses do their jobs, I'm fine with that. I do not care about the personal life of my president; I just care for him to run the country according to the values that his party adheres to. Same thing goes for Brendan.

Christie, who in a much better position that I am to speak about that, says:

Certainly it would be problematic if Brendan’s behavior within Mozilla was explicitly discriminatory, or implicitly so in the form of repeated microagressions. I haven’t personally seen this (although to be clear, I was not part of Brendan’s reporting structure until today). To the contrary, over the years I have watched Brendan be an ally in many areas and bring clarity and leadership when needed. Furthermore, I trust the oversight Mozilla has in place in the form of our chairperson, Mitchell Baker, and our board of directors.

The way people demanded a public apology reminded me of the glorious times of Soviet Russia and Communist China. What next? Should Brendan be photoshopped out of all the pictures? If we leave the matter as is, the only reasonable thing left to do is to add an extra round of interviews when hiring people: the political interview. There, we should make sure that the people we hire share the "right" political opinion. Otherwise, it seems like they is no space for them in the Mozilla Community.

Andrew Sullivan wrote:

If this is the gay rights movement today – hounding our opponents with a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else – then count me out. If we are about intimidating the free speech of others, we are no better than the anti-gay bullies who came before us.

While being a strong supporter of the movement, I really feel sad today: what legitimacy is there now for people who've been dragging through the mud an opponent, instead of treating them like a decent, human being? Is this what Mozilla is about?

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